Japan is facing the most serious security situation in the region since the Second World War, claims Prime Minister Kumio Kishida. Now a historic armament of the country's military is promised.

Japan's Prime Minister Fumio Kishida at a meeting in the House of Commons of the Japanese Parliament in Tokyo.
Japan's Prime Minister Fumio Kishida at a meeting in the House of Commons of the Japanese Parliament in Tokyo.

In December, Fumio Kishida's government adopted a number of security and defense reforms which in part derogated from the strict only self-defense principle which has prevailed since the end of the Second World War, when a ban on a regular military force was written into the country's constitution.

Japan wants to be able to counter-attack the country and speed up the development of radio reconnaissance that can detect incoming missiles from, for example, North Korea – something that should be made possible by a nearly double defense budget over the next five years.

The new defense strategy aims to keep China's ever-growing territorial ambitions in check, according to Tokyo. At the same time, the subject is sensitive to many neighboring countries in regions whose population was the victim of Japan's aggression during World War II. According to Kishida, the new commandments mean a "drastic turnaround" of the country's security policy, but the Prime Minister also underlines that the country is still dedicated to its pacifist constitution and strict anti-nuclear policy.

Kishida states that China is "the biggest strategic challenge" for peace and security in the region. Meanwhile, the Japanese leader is hoping for continued dialog with Beijing and President Xi Jinping.